April 23, 2021

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Grocery Shopping Products for the Pantry

Everyday Dorie: The Way I Cook


Price: points - Details)


2019 James Beard General Cookbook Award Finalist

To the hundreds of thousands who follow her on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, Dorie Greenspan’s food is powerfully cookable—her recipes instant classics. In Everyday Dorie, she invites readers into her kitchen to savor the dishes that she makes all the time, from Miso-Glazed Salmon to Lemon Goop.

What makes a “Dorie recipe”?

Each one has a small surprise that makes it special. Mustard and walnuts in the cheese puffs. Cherry tomatoes stuffed into red bell peppers and oven-charred. Cannellini beans in cod en papillote. The dishes are practical, made with common ingredients from the supermarket, farmers’ market, or pantry, like Sweet Chili Chicken Thighs, which is both weeknight simple and fine enough for company, and Eton Mess, a beautifully casual dessert of crumbled meringue, fruit, and whipped cream. They are easygoing, providing swaps and substitutions. They invite mixing and matching. Many can be served as dinner, or as a side dish, or as an appetizer, or hot, cold, or room temperature. And every single one is like a best friend in the kitchen, full of Dorie’s infectious love of cooking and her trademark hand-holding directions.



From the Publisher

A Look Inside Everyday Dorie

everyday dorie

everyday dorie

everyday dorie

everyday dorie

everyday dorie

everyday dorie

Lemon ‘Goop’ and Syrup

Chicken and Salad Milanese Style

Triple-Layer Parsnip and Cranberry Cake

everyday dorie
everyday dorie

Ricotta Spoonable from Everyday Dorie

Makes about 2 cups

Take a peek in my fridge, and you’ll find the usual staples—milk, butter, eggs, yogurt, and my favorite plus-one: ‘ricotta spoonable.’ I started making it years ago and I’ve probably never made it the same way twice. It’s a mix of ricotta, lots of chopped herbs, freshly grated lemon zest, olive oil and plenty of salt and pepper. It’s simple but special.

I prepare this year-round, changing the herbs according to what I have at hand, but I make it most often in summer, when I’m apt to fill the table with small plates of good stuff, things that don’t need to be eaten in any order and that lend themselves to mixing and matching. Put the spoonable into the mix, and it will match with beet salad, frittata, onion galette, charred peppers and so many other dishes.

A word on the ricotta

If there’s liquid in the container, it’s best to drain the cheese. Line a strainer with a double thickness of damp cheesecloth, place it over a bowl, spoon in the ricotta, pull the cheesecloth around the cheese

and weight it with a plate. Put it in the refrigerator and let it drain for at least 30 minutes, or up to 1 day.

Directions

Put the ricotta in a medium bowl. Finely grate the zest of the lemon over it, then halve and squeeze the lemon and blend in the juice. Stir in the shallots, scallions, olive oil, salt and a healthy pinch of pepper. Taste for salt and pepper, then stir in the herbs.

Cover and chill for 1 hour before serving.

Choices: A dollop of this on a cracker or sliced baguette makes a good appetizer; more of it on dark bread with roasted tomatoes or sliced cucumbers makes a tartine; and a lot of it stirred into pasta makes a dinner.

Storing: This is best the day it is made, but you can keep it for up to 2 days tightly covered in the refrigerator. Stir before using.

Ingredients

2 cups (492 grams) whole-milk ricotta, drained if there’s liquid (see headnote)

1 large lemon, or more to taste

3 tablespoons minced shallots, rinsed and patted dry

2 scallions, white and light green parts only, thinly sliced

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling

About ½ teaspoon fleur de sel or ¼ teaspoon ne sea salt

Freshly ground pepper

⅓ cup (13 g) minced mixed fresh herbs, like dill, parsley, tarragon, thyme, cilantro and/or basil

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